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Crucial Ideas for Defining Modern Politics

CrucialIdeas for Defining Modern Politics

Theworld has seen a tremendous change in the way politics run. There hasbeen tremendous evolution of politics based on social, cultural andphilosophical points of view. The major current thoughts of modernpolitics and the World History began from the Eighteenth Century andthe commercial society from the French revolutions. The nineteenthcentury socialism, communism, liberalism, anarchism, to modernity arejust but the few steps of evolution that politics passed through. Inthe twentieth century, theories such as anti-imperialism and greenpolitical theories came up to explain thoughts political governancethoughts. A characteristic of human beings is that they always beginsomething new, and that does not mean that it is always permitted tostart something from the beginning, to create that thing out ofnothing (Arendt 5). This essay paper will discuss the crucial ideasfor defining the notion of “modern politics” in the modern world.

Notionsof modern politics originates from imaginations, which is thepremeditated denial of realistic truth, the ability to lie, thecapability to change facts, and the ability to act. All these factorsare interconnected thus giving support to imaginations. New actionswill have room in a human’s minds through destroying the old ones.The replacement of the new actions might result from mentallyremoving ourselves from the physical locations. Imaginations havemade the sun to shine, when it is actually raining. In other words,imagination is one crucial idea that can help define the notion ofmodern politics. What people have in their minds is different fromwhat the reality is about outside their minds (Arendt 5). Arendt alsoargues that lying did not just creep into politics by accident ofhuman sinfulness, especially among politicians. Factual truth istherefore always vulnerable to being perforated by a single lie ortorn to shreds by the organized lying groups, class of people, ordenied and deserted (6). Therefore, according to Arendt, modernpolitics has no room of imaginations and lying that carried the dayin the traditional times. Reality will always defeat a liar andmodern politics is a matter of current issues not just lying andimaginations (46).

Stratificationof people in the societies also is an idea that helps define modernpolitics. Commonly, all men, whenever they are spoken of, especiallythe elite people of the society, are noted for some of the qualitiesthat earn them higher blames or praises in the societies (Machiavelli77). Our societies has various characteristics of people some proudand others humane, one lustful and the other man full of integrity,one harsh and the other one an easy going person, and so forth.Traditionally, politicians used to work their way around the brainsof men. Modern politics requires a man that acts contrary tomaintaining his estate, and rather maneuver in a manner that upholdsfaith, charity, humanity and religion (79).

Agglomerationis a common idea in the modern politics. It is therefore, importantto note that the components of the multitudes around us have notsprung from nothing. In the traditional context, approximately thesame numbers of people were present. However, they were scatteredacross the world in small groups, or solitary. They lived a life toall appearances, divergent, dissociate, and apart. Each small groupor individual occupied his place in the society, town country,village or even a quarter of a town. Suddenly, these masses of peopleappear in agglomeration and looking in any direction, the view of themultitudes fill our eyes. They occupy the best places, the relativelyrefined creation of human culture, previously reserved to lessergroups, in a word, to minorities (Ortega 1). The society is always adynamic unity composed of two component factors: minorities andmasses. The minorities are a group of individuals, which arespecially qualified, while the masses are the groups of individualsof the average person in the society. Therefore, it is evident to theverge of platitude that the normal formation of multitude implies tothe coincidence of desires, ideas, ways of life, in the individualswho constitute it (2).

Thereexists operations, activities, and functions of the most diverseorder, which naturally special, and consequently cannot be carriedout properly without special skills. The masses formerly wanted toremain in their own state and did not want to acquire the skillsnecessary to perform the function. In the contemporary world, we seemore and more people acquiring the skills and fighting for theirchances to perform these functions. Masses are today exercisingfunctions in social life, which correspond to the functions that werereserved for the minorities. At the same time, these masses no longerobey the rules that were meant to govern the minorities, follow themor even respect them. They push them aside and supplant them (3). Weare living in a world full of circumstances, thus offering everyindividual equal opportunity to know his/her potential (6).

Innovationsand science have been very vital in explaining modern politics.Whenever man conceives something, he is pertinent to inquire theconsequences of it, and what effects he could do with it. Man canreason and reckon not only in number, but also in all other issuesthat one may be added unto or subtracted from the other. Therefore,the light of human minds is perspicuous words, but by exactdefinitions first snuffed and purged from ambiguity. Reason is thepace increase of science, the way and the benefit of humankind, theend (Hobbes 81). The passions that most of all cause the differencesof wit are principally: the more or less desire for power, riches,knowledge, and of honor. All these can be reduced t just the desirefor power (82). Humanity has shown an unending desire for power afterpower. The cause of this is however, not always that man hopes for anexhaustive delight in the power than he does in the already attained,or that man cannot be contented with the moderate power that he has,but because he cannot assure power and the means to live well as hedoes in the present state (83).

Manhas also made laws of nature, which they have included some bills ofrights and liberties in the laws. These laws of nature (founded onreason and science), have been very vital while defining modernpolitics (89). According to the manifesto of Europe, – the spectraof communism- all powers of the old Europe, for example, have formeda holy alliance to exercise these spectra.Thebourgeoisie has exposed every occupation hitherto honored and lookedup with reverence in the former times. It has done a great deal toconvert a physician, the priest, the lawyer, the man of science, thepoet, unto the paid wage laborers. Bourgeoisie has made sure thatfamily relationship is torn away to leave money relationship as theonly relation. Families nowadays relate to each other based on thefinancial aspects are concerned. Through bourgeoisie, the brutalvigor of the middle age happened, however, the “modern politics”has no room for brutal vigor though (Marx et al. 53).

Anothernotion is that there exist two types of forces in the society, whichare the forces of complacency and the force of bitterness and hatred.According to the African Studies Center,theforce of complacency consist of part of Negros who, after many yearsof oppression, are so low in terms of their self respect and thesense of “somebodiness”has a small place in their minds. This forced them to adjust tosegregation. In addition the degree of academic and fiscal securityand the way some of these Negros making profits by segregation, havebecome insensible to the issues that the masses are facing. The forceof bitterness and hatred perilously advocates for violence. Peoplefull of hatred and bitterness will want to have a revenge sort ofthing, thus encouraging violence. In places where violence is a norm,this sort of force can be very vital to describe the reasons for theviolence (King 1). Liberty has given the masses an opportunity todemonstrate their potentials and given all individuals equalopportunities to make their life what they wish it be. This ismajorly the reasons why we see demonstrations across the world, whena government violates the rights of these individuals.

WorksCited

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Arendt,Hannah. Crisesof the Republic.New York u.a: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1972. Print.

Hobbes,Thomas, Leviathan,New York, NY: Digireads, 2010. Print.

King,Martin L. Letterfrom the Birmingham Jail.San Francisco: Harper, 1994. Print.

Lippmann,Walter. PublicOpinion.United States: Filiquarian Pub., LLC, 2007. Print.

Machiavelli,Niccolo, ThePrince, NewYork, NY: Randy Dillon, 2009. Print.

Marx,Karl, Friedrich Engels, and David McLellan. TheCommunist Manifesto.Oxford: OUP Oxford, 1992. Internet resource.

Ortega,G. J. TheRevolt of the Masses.New York: W.W. Norton, 1993. Print.